Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Kenyan killed in Kampala bombing

Ugandan police inspect the destroyed Ethiopian Village restaurant in Kampala after twin bomb blasts late on July 11, 2010 tore through crowds of football fans watching the World Cup final, killing over 70 people, including an American, and wounding scores others.AFP PHOTO / TREVOR SNAPP

Ugandan police inspect the destroyed Ethiopian Village restaurant in Kampala after twin bomb blasts late on July 11, 2010 tore through crowds of football fans watching the World Cup final, killing over 70 people and wounding scores others. AFP PHOTO / TREVOR SNAPP 

By CAROLINE WAFULA in Nairobi and KEVIN J KELLEY in New York

One Kenyan is confirmed to have died in Sunday’s twin blasts in Uganda.

However, investigations are still going to confirm whether a second Kenyan could have died in the Kampala bombings.

Foreign Affairs minister Moses Wetang’ula, who issued a statement in Parliament, said details of the dead Kenyan had initially been entered wrongly. The blasts left 76 people dead and over 100 injured.

Thousands of Kenyans live and work in Uganda, a majority of them students in secondary schools and colleges.

A statement from the Foreign Affairs ministry identified the Kenyan as David Mutai Wafula, 35, from Ndivisi in Bungoma.

“Mr Wafula died in the Kyandondo Golf Club blast,” the statement said. “The body is still lying at Mulago Hospital mortuary in Kampala.”

According to the ministry, documents recovered from him showed he had entered Uganda from Sudan on July 3 using a temporary permit.

An employment card showing that he was an employee of JB Logistics Company of Uganda was also recovered. Authorities were yet to get a response from phone numbers on the employment card.

On Wednesday, Mr Wafula’s father, Mr Job Wafula, asked well wishers to help the family bring back the body to Kenya for burial.

Meanwhile, a senior US official has said neutralising the threat by Islamist insurgents in Somalia “is going to take years.”

In a briefing to reporters, the official added that the Obama administration is “working very closely” with Kenya and other countries in East Africa to prevent further attacks by al-Shabaab militants.

The official did not cite any change in US policy in the region following Sunday’s terrorist bombings in Uganda, but the Obama administration is reviewing its options.

Additional reporting By Paul Juma

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