Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Kimaiyo sworn in as Inspector General

PHOTO | PHOEBE OKALL Mr David Kimaiyo before the parliamentary committee on national security, chaired by Mr Fred Kapondi, at Parliament Buildings on December 20, 2012.

PHOTO | PHOEBE OKALL Mr David Kimaiyo before the parliamentary committee on national security, chaired by Mr Fred Kapondi, at Parliament Buildings on December 20, 2012.  NATION MEDIA GROUP

By FRED MUKINDA fmukinda@ke.nationmedia.com

Mr David Kimaiyo on Monday took oath of office as the first Inspector-General of Police, and immediately disclosed a plan to transform the force into an efficient service.

Over the next two months, he said, measures would be put in place to ensure a peaceful General Election, and declared that the 2008 post poll violence would not repeat itself under his watch.

Mr Kimaiyo became Kenya’s first Inspector-General after he was sworn in by Chief Justice Willy Mutunga at the Supreme Court in Nairobi.

“We shall not tolerate any acts of violence during this (election) period,” he said.

The police chief also cautioned politicians against hate speech and making statements likely to cause divisions.

Mr Justice Mutunga told him that the conduct of officers in preparation for elections would determine his legacy as the first Inspector-General.

“Police preparations for elections must go beyond numbers and force of arms. The police must earn the respect of the public as guardians of the common will, protectors of the weak, defenders of the lawful, and preservers of the peace,” said the CJ.

President Kibaki appointed Mr Kimaiyo for a four-year term after he was vetted and approved by Parliament in line with the Constitution.

Mr Kimaiyo’s plan further entails recalling all police officers who have over the years been serving as chauffeurs and bodyguards to VIPs like Cabinet ministers and MPs.

The officers will be redeployed in active law enforcement like conducting patrols and hunting criminals.

“We should never be accused of serving the high and mighty at the expense of the ordinary mwananchi,” he said.

The police boss also put on notice the more than 70,000 officers under his command, saying those who mistreat the public would be held accountable.

“Officers must not imagine that they have immunity against blatant human rights abuses,” he said.

Mr Kimaiyo also took office with promises to have the salaries of police officers increased according to the proposals of the Justice Ransley commission on police reforms. Following the appoint, Police Commissioner Mathew Iteere officially retired on Monday.

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