Sunday, December 5, 2010

Raila to table list of Kenya’s demands at UN climate talks

Delegates listen to a speech during a session of the UN climate change conference in Poznan December 1, 2008. Prime Minister Raila  Odinga is expected to address this year's conference where he will present Kenya’s demands to the world on the field of Climate Change. Photo/FILE

Delegates listen to a speech during a session of the UN climate change conference in Poznan December 1, 2008. Prime Minister Raila Odinga is expected to address this year's conference where he will present Kenya’s demands to the world on the field of Climate Change. Photo/FILE 

By DAVE OPIYO [email protected]

Prime Minister Raila Odinga will this week present a list of Kenya’s demands to the world on climate change.

The PM, who is already in Cuncun Mexico to attend the UN Climate talks, is also expected to host a meeting of small islands and vulnerable states that feel threatened by global warming.

Kenya, like other developing countries, has been severely hit by the negative effects of climate change. It has been experiencing droughts leading to massive water and food shortages.

A communiqué from Mr Dennis Onyango, the PM’s spokesman read: “The PM is expected to address a high level panel of the COP 16 Conference where he will present Kenya’s demands to the world on the field of Climate Change.”

Mr Odinga is expected to return to Kenya in time for the Jamhuri Day celebrations slated for December 12.

Response strategy

During last years climate change summit held in Copenhagen, Denmark, the government revealed it required at least Sh225 billion ($3 billion) to adequately roll out the first phase of its climate change response strategy.

Environment minister John Michuki said at the time that the ministry’s financial requirements were, however, expected to shoot up to $20 billion by 2030 as it intensifies campaigns against global warming.

More than 15,000 people are attending this year’s summit, which enters its second week on Monday.

However, expectations on a deal to cut carbon emissions are low since the negotiations in Copenhagen ended in chaos.

Already cracks are emerging between rich and poor nations as most developing countries, including China, demand an extension of the Kyoto Protocol.

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