Parents of paralysed children storm governor's office

Wednesday January 20 2016

A child sits under a tree outside Busia Governor's office on January 19, 2016. He is among the 28 children whose legs were paralysed after being injected at Akichelesit Dispensary in Teso North. The parents claim the physiotherapists the county government assigned to them following recommendations by doctors in Nairobi where the children were treated have all been withdrawn. PHOTO | TONNY OMONDI | NATION MEDIA GROUP

A child sits under a tree outside Busia Governor's office on January 19, 2016. He is among the 28 children whose legs were paralysed after being injected at Akichelesit Dispensary in Teso North. The parents claim the physiotherapists the county government assigned to them following recommendations by doctors in Nairobi where the children were treated have all been withdrawn. PHOTO | TONNY OMONDI | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By LINET WAFULA
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Twenty-eight children who were paralysed after being injected at a dispensary in Busia County will undergo fresh screening following protests by their parents.

Dr Asoka Itur, the county health chief officer, said the screening is aimed at establishing why similar symptoms were recurring despite the physiotherapy they had undergone.

His remarks come after parents of the affected children on Monday stormed Governor Sospeter Ojaamong’s office, protesting against what they described as neglect by the county government.

The children became paralysed in July last year due to the injection at Akichelesit Dispensary in Teso North Sub-County.

DEVELOPED WEAK LIMBS

They developed weak limbs, and most of them could not walk. Others had deep wounds due to the injection.

“We have organised for two physiotherapists to go to the area and conduct the screening,” said Dr Itur.

The paralysis has worsened, and some of the children have dropped out of school due to sores and severe pain in their legs.

“We want experts to establish the ‘poisonous substance’ that recurs in the bodies of our children that makes them develop high temperatures and headaches,” said a parent of one of the children, Mr Mathew Edijai.