Private water vendors in Nakuru given 14 days to get government approval

Water from most of boreholes in Nakuru is unsafe due to high levels of fluoride.

Tuesday January 12 2016

A water vending truck. Private water vendors in

A water vending truck. Private water vendors in Nakuru have 14 days to get analysis reports from the Government Chemist and medical report certificates to be allowed to remain in business. FILE PHOTO | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By MAGDALENE WANJA
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Private water vendors in Nakuru have 14 days to get analysis reports from the Government Chemist and medical report certificates to be allowed to remain in business.

County health officials have said water from most of boreholes in Nakuru, and which is sold to consumers, was unsafe due to high levels of fluoride.

Nakuru County Public Health Officer Samuel King’ori said that failure to comply with the Food, Drugs and Chemical Substance Act would lead to legal action taken against the vendors.

Mr King’ori added that water from most of the boreholes in the county was unsafe for human consumption as some of them were located near latrines.

A notice by the Nakuru County public health office dated January 6, 2016 and addressed to the operators indicated that those involved in private water business must get certification from the office of public health.

“All borehole owners should ensure that they have the 2016 business certificate and a medical certificate for borehole operators, water analysis from Kenya Bureau of Standards or Government Chemist and a copy of the 2015 license,” said Mr King’ori.

MEDICAL CERTIFICATES

He added that all owners of private water trucks must have a valid medical certificate for drivers and turn boys and ensure that the vehicles are inspected.

Mr King’ori noted that in Kihoto, Naivasha Sub-County, toilets and water sources are located only 10 metres apart contrary to the 30 metres recommendation.

He added that more than 100 bore holes in the county with high fluoride levels had been mapped.

Mr King’ori said that Naivasha was most affected by high fluoride levels of up to 15.7 mg.

This, he said, has adverse effects to the residents who suffer bone defects and browning of teeth.

“The recommended fluoride level in water by World Health Organization is 1.5 mg but in Nakuru County it ranges from 2.5 mg to 15.7 mg,” he said.

The health officer also noted that less than 20 per cent of Nakuru residents are connected to the sewer system adding that the department was already working with partners to expand and improve it.

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