2,000 police officers face sacking over graft

Agency publishes names of staff and asks public to give information that will help in vetting.

Friday January 15 2016

National Police Service Commission (NPSC) Chairman, Johnstone Kavuludi, accompanied by Uasin Gishu County Commissioner Abdi Hassan addresses the press during a courtesy call at the commissioner in Eldoret on November 4, 2015. NPSC published names of the officers from the traffic section and asked the public to provide information that may help in determining their suitability. PHOTO | JARED NYATAYA |

National Police Service Commission (NPSC) Chairman, Johnstone Kavuludi, accompanied by Uasin Gishu County Commissioner Abdi Hassan addresses the press during a courtesy call at the commissioner in Eldoret on November 4, 2015. NPSC published names of the officers from the traffic section and asked the public to provide information that may help in determining their suitability. PHOTO | JARED NYATAYA | NATION MEDIA GROUP

By FRED MUKINDA
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An organisation in charge of police discipline has sent the strongest signal yet that it is committed to wiping out corruption after targeting over 2,000 officers for removal.

The National Police Service Commission (NPSC) published names of the officers from the traffic section, which is deemed to be most affected by the vice, and asked the public to provide information that may help in determining their suitability as law enforcers.

The 2,130 hold the ranks of constable, corporal, sergeant, senior sergeant, inspector and chief inspector.

(READ: Fear grips police as M-Pesa accounts to be probed in vetting)

“The commission requests the public and institutions to participate in this process by submitting any relevant information that may assist in the determination of the suitability and competence of the officers,” said NPSC Chairman Johnston Kavuludi.

He added: “The commission intends to conduct the vetting of all officers to assess their suitability and competence and to discontinue the service of any police officer who fails in the vetting.”

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT SCRUTINY

The entire traffic department is under scrutiny because an earlier vetting of its commanders unearthed massive corruption, among other malpractices.

To protect whistle blowers, the commission promised not to reveal the identities of individuals who volunteer sensitive and incriminating information.

MASSIVE CORRUPTION

In October last year, 63 senior officers, most of them from the traffic section, were sacked after vetting unearthed massive corruption.

The NPSC will also assess officers on their financial probity, human rights record, academic qualifications, professionalism and efficiency, among other things.

Four years after the government adopted the Ransley report as a blueprint for police reforms, the transformation of the service into world class status is yet to be realised because the vetting has been slow.

Some officers in the traffic department receive bribes, especially from rogue motorists, and are constantly devising new ways of concealing their dirty activities.

For instance, they recruit middlemen who pose as touts on routes plied by matatus to collect money on their behalf.

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