KRA director denies Karua bribe claim

Director M’Mukindia says she did not collect Sh2m from BAT on behalf of Narc Kenya leader.

Wednesday January 13 2016

Narc Kenya leader Martha Karua addresses journalists at the party offices in Nairobi on December 21, 2015. A top KRA director on January 12, 2016 to fend off allegations she received Sh2 million bribe on behalf of Ms Karua. PHOTO | GERALD ANDERSON | NATION MEDIA GROU

Narc Kenya leader Martha Karua addresses journalists at the party offices in Nairobi on December 21, 2015. A top KRA director on January 12, 2016 to fend off allegations she received Sh2 million bribe on behalf of Ms Karua. PHOTO | GERALD ANDERSON | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By PETER LEFTIE
More by this Author

A top Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) official on Tuesday came out to fend off allegations she received a Sh2 million bribe on behalf of Narc Kenya leader Martha Karua.

Ms Mary M’Mukindia, a director at KRA, termed as false and inaccurate reports by a UK newspaper, the Independent, that she received the money in the run-up to the 2013 elections. 

“Kenya Revenue Authority Director, Ms Mary M’Mukindia, has described as false and inaccurate allegations that she received money from British American Tobacco on behalf of then presidential candidate Martha Karua,” she said in a statement.

She added: “Considering the serious nature of these allegations and their negative bearing on my integrity and reputation as well as my desire to establish the truth, I have initiated necessary legal steps both in Kenya and the UK to clear her name.”

(READ MORE: Martha Karua fights to save clean image)

While she supported Ms Karua’s presidential bid, Ms M’Mukindia, who once served as the  National Oil Corporation Chief Executive Officer insisted she was not a member of her campaign staff and had no mandate to fundraise or collect money on her behalf.

Ms Karua is on record admitting that she received the money from Mr Paul Hopkins, a dirty jobs man from the British American Tobacco.

She also said she met Mr Hopkins to thank him for the money, given in late 2012, which she said was not a bribe but a contribution to her presidential campaign.

The Independent reported that Mr Hopkins paid Ms Karua £50,000 (Sh7.5 million) to gain access to confidential documents relating to an anti-tobacco smuggling tender.

After the payment, the paper claimed, BAT was given tender documents and was able to manipulate, delay and influence the tendering.

Mr Hopkins, a former special forces soldier in the Irish army who worked in Kenya for many years, was a bag man for BAT and says he carried out on its behalf a large scale campaign of bribery to protect the company against health regulations and to sabotage competitors.

advertisement