‘Kingpins’ of fake foreign cash seized

Tuesday January 19 2016

Inspector-General of Police Joseph Boinnet during a security briefing at the Directorate of Criminal Investigations headquarters in Nairobi on January 18, 2016. He said detectives had seized $693.1 million and 369.million Euros in fake currency. Two suspects,  one from Cameroon and another from Niger, were arrested. PHOTO | ROBERT NGUGI | NATION MEDIA GROUP

Inspector-General of Police Joseph Boinnet during a security briefing at the Directorate of Criminal Investigations headquarters in Nairobi on January 18, 2016. He said detectives had seized $693.1 million and 369.million Euros in fake currency. Two suspects, one from Cameroon and another from Niger, were arrested. PHOTO | ROBERT NGUGI | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By ANGIRA ZADOCK
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Police have arrested two men believed to be behind a transnational fake currency ring in Africa and found about Sh111 billion in counterfeit foreign cash.

Detectives from the Directorate of Criminal Investigations headquarters arrested one man in Kilimani while his accomplice was apprehended in Diamond Park Estate on Mombasa Road, Nairobi.

Mr Ousman Ibrahim Bako, a Cameroonian and Mr Mohammed Sani alias Dr Mustafa from Niger were arrested on Sunday after a covert operation following reports from locals and foreigners that the two were involved in a multi-billion shilling racket.

Inspector-General of Police Joseph Boinett on Monday said the last complaint was reported by businessmen who were conned of more than Sh40 million, purportedly in exchange of foreign currency shipped from Syria.

“We have in the past received a complaint from the Government of the Comoros that certain foreigners in Kenya were manufacturing fake notes and circulating them,” Mr Boinnet said. 

GLOBAL CRIMINAL SYNDICATE

Police said they found $693.1million and 369.6 million Euros in safes.

The dollars were in denominations of 100 while the Euros were in 500s.

Also found were money printing machines, cutters, scanners, five safes, two computers, chemicals, masks and foil paper.

“We believe that these are the kingpins of printing money in exchange of dollars,” the police boss said.

Mr Boinett was addressing the media at DCI headquarters where he also said the detectives believed the men had contacts with fake currency note suppliers from outside the continent.

“Some of their accomplices are on our radar and we will arrest them soon,” Mr Boinett said.

The notes were seized for forensic examination and were found to have at least 70 per cent security features of genuine currencies.

Police said the two men were taken to court but were remanded for another two days as investigations were being completed. 

Mr Boinett warned that security agents would not tolerate foreigners abusing Kenya’s hospitality.

“We only welcome foreigners and businessmen in this country and not criminals. We will deal with the criminals in accordance with the law,” he said.