SRC fights to dispel job evaluation fears

Tuesday March 8 2016

Salaries and Remuneration Commission (SRC) chairperson Sarah Serem (right), Public Service Commission chairperson Margaret Kobia (centre) and SRC's vice-chairperson David Ogutu address the media on September 22, 2015. SRC say the ongoing teachers evaluation would not result in pay cuts. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE | NATION MEDIA GROUP

Salaries and Remuneration Commission (SRC) chairperson Sarah Serem (right), Public Service Commission chairperson Margaret Kobia (centre) and SRC's vice-chairperson David Ogutu address the media on September 22, 2015. SRC say the ongoing teachers evaluation would not result in pay cuts. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By MOSES ODHIAMBO
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The Salaries and Remuneration Commission (SRC) on Monday sought to dispel teachers’ fears that the ongoing job evaluation would result in pay cuts.

It said the review being carried out in the 47 counties was aimed at determining the monetary worth of the 32 job groups in the teaching service.

The exercise would determine if a job is fairly compensated, is undervalued or overvalued, said SRC vice-chairperson Daniel Ogutu in Kisumu.

Those found to be earning less than they deserve will get a pay rise, subject to availability of funds, he said.

“The evaluation will not raise or cut salaries. It will only help us understand the real worth of the jobs so that unions can now have a basis for salary review negotiations,” he added, when he launched the review in Kisumu.

“In the event someone is paid less, then we will advise Parliament to allocate money to cater for the adjustment. Those whose jobs will come out as overvalued will continue earning their current salaries. There will be no downgrading.”

“We are dealing with individual employees. We shall advise the county and national governments on the remuneration scales going by the job worth,” he said.

The Kenya National Union of Teachers has opposed the evaluation and vowed to frustrate it by asking members to keep off.

Secretary-general Wilson Sossion has described it as a ploy to scuttle negotiations for the 50-60 per cent salary rise.

But Mr Ogutu said Monday the unions had been involved before the review began and urged them not to confuse the evaluation with the performance contracting by the Teachers Service Commission.

“We have had discussions with the unions at all levels and we don’t think they had issues about the evaluation,” he said.

The study is expected to end disparities in salaries paid to government workers because the  public service has never been evaluated and salaries are normally paid depending on how individual groups negotiated.