Nairobi County employees lead in absenteeism and lateness

Kisii Governor James Ongwae terms the EACC report unfair.

Thursday March 17 2016

Kakamega Governor Wycliffe Oparanya (left) Migori Governor Okoth Obado, Julius Malombe (Kitui) and Josephat Nanok  (Turkana) address journalists during the County Governors and Urban Development Executives’ Leadership Conference in Nairobi, on November 2, 2015. ROBERT NGUGI | NATION MEDIA GROUP

Kakamega Governor Wycliffe Oparanya (left) Migori Governor Okoth Obado, Julius Malombe (Kitui) and Josephat Nanok (Turkana) address journalists during the County Governors and Urban Development Executives’ Leadership Conference in Nairobi, on November 2, 2015. ROBERT NGUGI | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By SAMUEL KARANJA
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By PETER LEFTIE
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Tana River, Turkana, Samburu, Nyamira and Meru are the counties with no or few cases of bribery, lateness, absenteeism or delays in service.

According to a survey conducted by the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission, Turkana and Tana River are the only counties where bribes have not been demanded in exchange for services.

The survey was conducted between August 23 and October 23, 2015.

For Turkana, which is headed by Governor Josephat Nanok, it is an improvement from 2012, when only one bribery case was recorded.

Samburu, headed by Governor Moses Lenolkulal is the county where service is least delayed.

It topped eight counties with a score of 0.1 per cent, followed by Tana River at 0.21 per cent and West Pokot (0.5 per cent).

Lamu and Isiolo tied at 0.6 per cent while Elgeyo-Marakwet had a score of 0.7 per cent and Baringo and Vihiga 0.8 per cent. Kilifi scored 1.0 per cent.

Nyamira, Meru, Laikipia and Elgeyo-Marakwet scored highly as counties with few cases of lateness and absenteeism.

All had a 0.3 per cent, followed by Tana River, Kirinyaga and Bomet, at 0.6 per cent.

DELIBERATE SERVICE DELAYS

Respondents said the three most common forms of unethical behaviour exhibited by public officials are deliberate delays in service (32 per cent), bribery (27.1 per cent) and lateness and absenteeism (23.1 per cent).

Only Mandera County was not surveyed because of insecurity at the time. 

The National Ethics and Corruption Survey 2015 reveals that counties where residents wait for long before being served are Kisii (6.6 per cent ), Nyeri (6.3 per cent)  Bomet (5.5 per cent) and  Homa Bay (5.4 per cent) .

Others are Kiambu (5.1 per cent) Nairobi (4.8 per cent) Meru (4.3 per cent) and Murang’a (4.2 per cent).

Kisii Governor James Ongwae termed the report unfair, saying the devolved unit’s operations may have been hampered by delays in cash release from the National Treasury.

“This affected our operations and may have led to the rumours that eventually informed sections of the report. My government is committed to the war on corruption and prudent utilisation of public resources,” he said.

“The report does not reflect the position on the ground.”

Nairobi County Government employees lead in absenteeism and reporting late for work.

The county scored 9.6 per cent, while Kakamega came second with 8.1 per cent. 

Kiambu had a score of 5.1 per cent and Narok had 4.5 per cent.

Other counties in that category are Bungoma (4.2 per cent) Kilifi (4.2 per cent), Marsabit (3.9 per cent) and Mombasa (3.9 per cent).

Elgeyo-Marakwet, Laikipia, Meru and Nyamira have the most punctual workers.

They scored 0.3 per cent. Others in this category are Garissa, Homa Bay, Migori,Trans Nzoia, West Pokot, Bomet, Kirinyaga and Tana River, which tied at 0.6 per cent.

EMBEZZLEMENT

“Giving and taking bribes was the leading form of corruption cited by 96.2 per cent of respondents, followed by embezzlement of public funds (59.1 per cent) and misappropriation of funds (54.8 per cent),” says the report.

Comparing the current level of corruption in the country with a  year ago, 50.4 per cent said the vice had gone up.

The survey showed a divide on expectation about the levels of corruption in the coming year with 38.8 per cent of the respondents saying it would decrease while 30.1 per cent said it would shoot up.

About 52 per cent of the respondents said they had witnessed a corrupt act by a public officer but only 5.7 per cent reported what they had seen to the concerned authorities.

Report by Dave Opiyo, Mathias Ringa, Farouk Mwabege, Aggrey Omboki, Charles Wanyoro and Abdimalik Hajir

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