THE CUTTING EDGE

Which unity are we preaching when discrimination is an institutional policy?

Monday January 4 2016

WORRYING ATTITUDE: None of the top 10 candidates in last year’s KCPE examination is keen on pursuing a degree in education to become a schoolteacher, says Dennis Sinyo, citing their media interviews after Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i released the results. He finds this negative attitude towards teaching among the bright young Kenyans terribly worrying. But Dennis suspects it could also have something to do with the frequent teachers’ strikes for pay, which have eroded their status. His contact is [email protected]

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RECREATION FACILITIES: During the just-ended holidays, Wambua Musembi says he found Machakos county quite welcoming to visitors, thanks to the recreation facilities. He was particularly impressed with the Machakos People’s Park, where many revellers flocked for their enjoyment. However, there was only one misgiving: the lax security arrangements. He was, for instance, surprised to note that people were not being frisked at the gate. “If the people coming in could be checked, this would complete the fun.” His contact is [email protected]

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CUSTOMER CARE: Airtel risks losing a customer, Francis Chachi, whose line, No. 0754833825, which he had registered at the mobile phone service provider’s outlet in Busia town, on December 21, last year, has never worked. On December 28, he travelled to Kakamega town to seek help at an Airtel shop, to no avail. “This is how to lose a customer!” remarks Francis, who wishes to inform Airtel that he cannot wait forever to get the service and that there are other options he might just be forced to consider. His contact [email protected]

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NONSENSICAL DIRECTIVE: With a family he describes as a “mini-United Nations”, Kanyi Gioko is appalled at the nonsensical directive requiring motorists to carry in their cars only people who bear the same surname as themselves. “How are we supposed to travel during the holidays when police insist on a common name for passengers riding private vehicles? Which unity are we preaching when discrimination is an institutional policy? We have bigger problems to solve. Somebody should make our police do some real work.” His contact is [email protected]

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IMPRESSIVE OFFICER: Of the numerous police roadblocks mounted on the Nairobi-Kisumu highway on December 31, Jim Webo says he was pleasantly surprised at the polite, friendly, and meticulous senior officer leading a team of younger colleagues who flagged down the vehicle he was travelling in near Kericho town. “He shook hands with me, another passenger, and the driver and asked for her licence, continuing his chitchat. He then checked the insurance sticker, and waved us on, after bidding us goodbye,” adds Jim, impressed with the officer’s good example.

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NOISE POLLUTION: Every time she boards a matatu, especially in Nairobi’s Eastlands, Nancy Aneli says, she is subjected to noisy harassment. “I feel tormented as after a long day at work comes the loud profanity blaring from speakers. Try to politely ask them to lower the volume or play cleaner music and you will either be ignored or worse, rudely told to alight if you are too old or ‘face the music’. Who will save peace-loving passengers from the raunchy headache-causing noise as Nema seems to have gone AWOL?” Her contact is [email protected]

Have a decent day, won’t you!