THE CUTTING EDGE

School heads only implement budget proposals endorsed at annual general meetings.

Friday January 8 2016

By THE WATCHMAN
More by this Author

TEACHERS BLAMELESS: Headteachers are being wrongly blamed for the hefty school fee increases because they cannot unilaterally make such changes, says Joe Ngige Mungai. School heads, he adds, only implement budget proposals endorsed at annual general meetings. “The critics are being hypocritical as school budgets are taken to county education directors’ offices for onward transmission to the Education Ministry’s headquarters in Nairobi. The new charges are the work of parents and not the headteachers.” His contact is [email protected]

****

FAILURES: Moved by Dennis Sinyo’s lament that the children who excel in the KCPE examination have no interest in courses that would lead them to a career in teaching is J. Chumbali, who says that it is, indeed, true. The very bright children, he adds, only dream about eventually taking courses such as law and medicine. To them, he adds, teaching sounds like a profession only for failures. “How do we then improve the standard of education? Someone is sleeping on the job and should now wake up.” His contact is [email protected]

****

CONSERVATION: For his part, Clifton Opala is worried about the top KCPE exam candidates’ apparent lack of interest in agriculture and environmental conservation. “They do not seem to realise that doctors, lawyers, engineers, and architects and their clients and patients need to have at least two square meals a day and to drink clean water and breathe in fresh oxygen. I hope to one day mentor young brilliant minds to consider careers in agriculture and environmental conservation because that is where we need our best brains.” His contact is [email protected]

****

ID HEADACHE: On the issuing of national identity cards, Kiplimo Kosgey says he is writing with a heavy heart over his frustrations. He was born in Trans Nzoia and the particulars on his ID indicate that, but there is a problem when it comes to his children. “They were born and brought up elsewhere, so why should they be required to go to Trans Nzoia to register for IDs when they attain the age of 18. These children do not know anything about my place of birth. Why can’t they get IDs where they were born and are well-known?” His contact is [email protected]

****

DEATH OBSESSION: The display of coffins by hospital gates is bringing services closer to the people, says X. N. Iraki, adding: “I saw that in Nyahururu, too, and on getting into Machakos town, the first thing you notice on your left are funeral homes. Police have also been displaying car wrecks to remind us of death. Even their guns are about death. We are obsessed with death and pessimism, which hold progress hostage. That is why we place death announcements in the media, but not births.” His contact is [email protected]

****

COMMERCIAL MOURNING: Some tasks that were traditionally performed by family members are now being commercialised, says Jim Webo, amused that one can now hire professional mourners. And the more money one is willing to pay, the more special sound effects one gets, from performing outside the mortuary to wailing as the cortege arrives at home and slower dirges to sustain the sad environment during the entire mourning period and it can’t get more hilarious than regular contributor X.N. Iraki’s reference to himself as Africa’s only certified dowry negotiator.

Have a changing day, won’t you!