THE CUTTING EDGE

Dispatching national examinations to schools by email is an idea that the Knec should explore.

Tuesday March 8 2016

By THE WATCHMAN
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KITS PUZZLE: IEBC chief executive Ezra Chiloba, Taabu Tele says, missed a great opportunity to redeem the image and credibility of the commission by casually explaining how some 200 BVR kits ended up at the Ministry of Devolution. “That explanation could open a can of worms as the ministry is neck-deep in mega graft allegations, headlined by the NYS, which the opposition is accusing of being involved in a scheme to rig the elections. The irony is that the IEBC, which says it is short of the kits, sold some to the Devolution ministry.” His contact is [email protected]

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CULTURE OF LIES: Dispatching national examinations to schools by email is, indeed, an idea that the Knec should explore as it will help minimise or eliminate cheating and ensure accountability in the management of this vital duty, says Daniel Marende. Cheating, he adds, does not only happen in examinations, it is also rampant in “the real world of governance, leadership, community and the family, where a man lies to his son, who will have asked his mother to lie to him about a lie, which his principal will have told in school”. His contact is [email protected]

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EXAM RANKING: Debate is raging again on the ranking of candidates and schools in national examinations, which a disgusted Ruth Gituma believes is nothing but the “madness of the so-called best school”. And it is because, she explains, “the playing ground will never be levelled”. A student in a remote school cannot be on an equal footing with another in a well-endowed institution in the towns. Ruth hopes Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i will restore sanity in education and fix the curriculum in line with changing trends. Her contact is [email protected]

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APPALLING STASISTICS: One statistic that has shocked Mary Kamau beyond words is the one that says that 39 per cent of all the prisoners in central Kenya are sex offenders whose victims were minors. She wonders what became of the Sexual Offences Act that former Nominated MP Njoki Ndung’u, now a Supreme Court judge, was so instrumental in getting enacted. “We need to protect our children by handing out deterrent sentences.” Mary, whose contact is [email protected], hopes the authorities, and especially those in the Judiciary, are listening.

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UNPATRIOTIC: A fortnight ago, Silas Nyambok was travelling and switched on his car radio, keen to follow updates on an English Premier League football match between Manchester United and Arsenal, and on scanning for a channel, stumbled on the State broadcaster, KBC Radio, which was relaying the match live. He asks: “Why should a government-owned station ignore our own football matches and cover foreign games?” To him, this shows to what extent the leadership of that station has lost its sense of direction. His contact is [email protected]

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STRANGE HABIT: At various forums or meetings that he has attended, X.N. Iraki says he gets rather amused when speakers keep on telling members of the audience to clap for themselves over some achievement. He asks: “Where did this strange habit come from? Why should one clap for oneself? Isn’t appreciation for a job well done supposed to come from other people and not the self? Could this habit be an indication of what a thankless society we have become that we rarely appreciate the achievements of one another?” His contact is [email protected]  

Have a rousing day, won’t you!