THE CUTTING EDGE

Youth Enterprise Development Fund should be disbanded and its disbursement entrusted to either KCB or Cooperative Bank.

Tuesday March 15 2016

HEAVY BURDEN: The Youth Enterprise Development Fund should be disbanded and the disbursement of the money entrusted to either KCB or Cooperative Bank, urges Ken Ogare, alarmed at the looting of the coffers by officials expected to assist young people to access cheap loans to start businesses or development projects. The bloated organisation, he adds, is a burden on taxpayers and yet it is not discharging its duties. “Any youth group will confirm that getting money from this body is like trying to squeeze water from a stone.” His contact is [email protected].com.

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EXPLOITATION OF STUDENTS: Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i’s description of the rush by public universities to open satellite campuses as “madness” and “exploitation of students”, is scary, but quite refreshing is his vow to stop it. “However, the elephant in the room is class sizes. Some public universities have 800 students in a class, forcing a lecturer to use a public address system. If in secondary school, 50 students in a class are too many, why is this allowed? This is not exploitation but outright robbery.” His contact is [email protected]

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RISKY CELEBRATION: While it is in order for schools that excel in national examinations to celebrate their success, Said Gakuria says this must not come at risk to the students expected to continue that impressive run. Said is putting on notice the school heads who allowed students to pour out of their compounds into the streets, singing and chanting. “It is quite irresponsible of the school administrations to let pupils loose, endangering their own safety. The jubilation must be confined within the school perimeter fence.” His contact is [email protected]

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USURIOUS RATES: Concerned about the high lending rates is Frederick Austin, who says the huge half- and full-year results being announced by banks are proof that something needs to be done to curb the exploitation of borrowers. “The interest rates are so high that debtors are being milked dry as the banks rake in billions.” However, Frederick believes it would not be prudent for Parliament to introduce controls in a liberalised economy. Without mentioning any, he argues that there are better ways of bringing interest rates down. His contact is [email protected]

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LOUSY MANAGEMENT: The statue outside the Safaricom Stadium at Kasarani, Nairobi, of an athlete waving the Kenyan flag is lousy and an apt reflection of the poor performance by the sports administrators, says Thomas Yebei. “The statue was poorly designed, poorly moulded, and made of poor quality materials. It’s shameful and in no way represents the fine Kenyan athletics talent.” In short, it is an eyesore that Thomas would have wished to see pulled down and the job given to one of the many fine artists to do something better. His contact is [email protected]

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GOOD ECONOMY: The presence of illegal immigrants in Kenya “shows that the economy is doing well despite all the political noise”, says X.N. Iraki. According to him, immigrants would not take such a risk to enter a hopeless country. “It means that outsiders can see economic opportunities we ourselves cannot see because we are transfixed on politics. While we cannot rule out human trafficking, great economies including the US and EU, attract lots of illegal immigrants. Who said GDP growth rate is the only measure of an economy’s wellbeing?” His contact is [email protected]

 Have an attractive day, won’t you!