THE CUTTING EDGE

Sunday August 6 2017

HIGH STAKES: During Tuesday’s elections, it’s important that the key players, especially the IEBC, be held fully responsible for ensuring that this vital opportunity for Kenyans to choose their leaders for the next five years is free, fair and credible, says Lemargeroi Saruni. Conducting such a highly contested election, with extremely high stakes, he adds, demands high integrity, honesty and reliability of all the officials. “This seriousness is what the IEBC, the Judiciary, the police, agents and observers must help to uphold.” His contact is [email protected]

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PEACE AND UNITY: Foremost on Robert Mukirae’s mind as the country goes to the polls is the need to maintain peace and unity. Says he: “Kudos Watchie for providing such a unique forum. No other media column allows Kenyans such space to vent, pontificate, cajole, complain and holler. Despite this, no blood has ever been spilt under your watch. In the same vein, let us all vote tomorrow and irrespective of whoever wins, our beloved Kenya must remain standing, peaceful, prosperous and united. God bless Kenya!” His contact is [email protected].

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DIGITAL VOTING: A country like Kenya with remarkable advances in the use of technology should by now have adopted digital voting for convenience and reliability, says Jake Mwaniki. The IEBC, he adds, could have developed customised mobile applications to enable people to vote online, “as happens in the developed countries of the world”. This, he believes, would have enabled voters to cast their ballots from anywhere, and the fears of a low turnout as some people flee towns for their rural homes would never have occurred. His contact is [email protected]

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WASTE OF TIME: What Jesse Kamwaro says he cannot understand is why many matatu drivers only realise that they do not have enough fuel once passengers have boarded, and that after queuing at a terminus for a long time. Ideally, he adds, the drivers should first go to the petrol station, refuel, check the water in the radiators and pressure in their tyres before getting on the queue to wait for passengers. “I often get really offended when I am in a rush and a matatu that is already full, with the fare collected, goes into a petrol station, wasting another up to 30 minutes.” His contact is [email protected]

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LITTLE PROGRESS: The minimal progress made so far in the construction of the less than five-kilometre Lower Hill Road, Nairobi, which began several months ago, is a source of concern to Sam Oyugi. Says he: “Considering the pace at which the work is being done, it will take several years to be complete.” Sam is, therefore, appealing to the Kenya Urban Roads Authority engineer supervising the project to take a keener interest in the job and have it speeded up to eventually ease the inconvenience to motorists. His contact is [email protected]

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MOVING STORY: Though quite moved by the story of an expectant mother’s agony at the Naivasha District Hospital, who demanded that a Caesarean section be performed on her, Joseph Macharia says that was only a fraction of the sorry state of health care. He adds: “Ironically, there was no mention of two other pregnant women in labour, including a close relative of mine, who were just turned away as I watched.” Joseph wishes the accounts of the suffering of these two other women had also been highlighted. His contact is [email protected]

Have a helpful day, won’t you!