Security chiefs settle Trans Mara boundary dispute

The police boss says many people are fighting over a one-acre shamba.

A section of the warring groups convene at Pimbinyiet on July 15, 2016. A squabble between two elders in Nkararo area has led to a fierce fight between the Siria and Wuasi Nkishu Maasai clans. PHOTO | RUTH MBULA | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

IN SUMMARY

  • Trans Mara West police boss David Wambua said a squabble between two elders in Nkararo area has led to a fierce fight between the Siria and Wuasi Nkishu Maasai clans.

  • Following clashes over the boundary, 15 people were last week wounded with arrows and a number of them hospitalised.

  • A new boundary was established by surveyors on Tuesday in the presence of representatives of both clans. 

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Security agencies in Trans Mara, Narok county, have stepped in to resolve a boundary dispute between two families, which has morphed into a fight between two clans. 

Trans Mara West police boss David Wambua said a squabble between two elders in Nkararo area has led to a fierce fight between the Siria and Wuasi Nkishu Maasai clans.

'ONE-ACRE SHAMBA'

Following clashes over the boundary, 15 people were last week wounded with arrows and a number of them hospitalised.

"The dispute stems from a disagreement over the exact location of a boundary between two land parcels from two adjoining adjudication sections - Enoosaen and Nkararo," said Mr Wambua.

He noted that the violence was uncalled for as a large number of people should not fight over a one-acre shamba.

Trans Mara West deputy county commissioner Mohammed Noor said a new boundary was established by surveyors on Tuesday in the presence of representatives of both clans. 

"We have brokered a peace deal between the two factions by delineating the contentious boundary. The lands registrar oversaw the digging of a visible trench to act as a barrier," Mr Noor said, adding that both parties accepted the development and promised to keep peace.

DISARMAMENT

Land issues are said to be the reasons for the frequent cases of armed violence in the region.

Interior Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang'i said a disarmament exercise which began in July would continue; at least 100 firearms, some lethal, have been recovered so far.

When he visited Njipiship area last month, Mr Matiang'i extended a 21-day amnesty to September 1 for residents to surrender guns.

He urged them to comply with the law before the government forcibly recovers the weapons.

"More guns are still in civilian hands. We will soon come for them," the CS said.

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