THE CUTTING EDGE

What you need to know:

  • Just close bars, churches and markets and issue strict public transport guidelines.

LOCKDOWN: With mounting speculation about the upcoming summit of President Uhuru Kenyatta and governors on the Covid-19 pandemic, George Forest’s passionate appeal is that the country is not locked down again. The leaders, he adds, should ensure that Kenyans obey the rules to avoid infection with the virus. “Lockdown only punishes the wrong people — such as those going to the farm. Why should a motorist without passengers, wearing a face mask on and carrying a sanitiser be blocked from travelling? Just close bars, churches and markets and issue strict public transport guidelines. Then punish those disobeying the rules.” His contact is [email protected]

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SIN TAX: These are, indeed, difficult times with the Covid-19 infections giving the authorities sleepless nights, but Ed Mwiti is not amused about some of the proposals being considered. A good example, he adds, is to outlaw “sitting down in bars and yet sin tax is a good source of tax revenue for the government”. He poses: “Why not just declare Kenya an alcohol-free nation and go on with other business? Come next June, you will be raising the sin tax rates after making the running of bars insufferable.” His contact is [email protected]

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WEAK POWER: Several months ago, Kisumu resident Charles Okore complained about a week-long blackout and power was restored. But the celebration was short-lived as Charles realised he could not use any electrical or electronic appliances or gadgets as the power he gets is too weak to run them. “I have a strong feeling that an unscrupulous technician introduced heavy resistance at the pole to punish me for exposing them. Last week, one came to check on my meter and went away without solving the problem. Can Kenya Power assure me that my fears are farfetched?” His account is 31149494 and his contact, charlesokore2@gmail.com.

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MAN FOR THE JOB: Since the first Covid-19 case was confirmed in the country in mid-March, one person who has become a permanent fixture at the daily updates at Afya House, Nairobi, on the disease is not Health Cabinet Secretary Mutahi Kagwe but Acting Director-General Patrick Amoth, notes David Jasondu. And as somebody else pointed out recently, Jasondu has been wondering what the man needs to do to be confirmed. “Dr Amoth has distinguished himself as a solid professional, knowledgeable in health matters and eloquent. If there was any proof needed for him to be confirmed, he has provided it,” Jasondu declares.

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DARKNESS RECORD: This must be a record of sorts that nobody, not even Kenya Power, which is targeted here, would wish to be associated with. Four months since the electricity transformer that serves Bugaya Village in Samia, Funyula Constituency in Busia County blew up, the residents have had to relearn how to use paraffin lamps, and it is not funny at all. One of those affected, Arthur Mbetera, says they have not just sat back and waited for the power utility to bring them back into the 21st Century as they contend with dark nights. “Our efforts to get Kenya Power’s Busia Town office to replace the faulty transformer have been futile,” moans Arthur, whose contact is [email protected]

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LOST IN TRANSLATION: Information about pandemics and other disease outbreaks, Alfred Mtawali remarks, “must be communicated in a clear, accurate and natural way”. It is sad, he notes, that in Kenya, such messages are wrongly translated and misleading. As the president of the East Africa Interpreters and Translators Association, he’s particularly concerned about Covid-19 Kiswahili translations by Kenya Airports Authority. He cites “Umbali wa Kijamii for social distancing”, with two illustrations of a man and a woman, and “Weka Umbali (keep distance)”. That, he cautions, can have deadly effects. His contact is [email protected]

Have an accurate day, won’t you!