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THE CUTTING EDGE

Saturday June 27 2020
By THE WATCHMAN

DIPLOMATIC GIANT: Winning the UN Security Council non-permanent seat speaks volumes about Kenya’s diplomatic prowess, says Alnashir Walji, particularly grateful to the African Union for endorsing the country’s candidature. “Our country has always played a pivotal role in international and continental politics, such as mediating in the South Sudan crisis. In Somalia, we are helping to flush out Al-Shabaab terrorists through Amisom with help from the US and other powers. Kenya is a hub for major conferences hosted at Unep headquarters at Gigiri, Nairobi.” Kenya has also played a key role in revamping the East African Community and in Igad. His contact is [email protected].


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PIPE DREAM: The Safaricom 4G network remains a pipe dream even in places not far from the gigantic telco’s headquarters in Nairobi. Pita Njoroge, who lives nearby in Karura Kanyungu Village, Kabete, in Kiambu County, says he is disheartened by the poor reception. “Safaricom has been the best network. But we have complained numerous times over the years, pointing out how we need a cell tower nearer our place as we live in a valley.” A promise to put up one in the first quarter of the year has not materialised. Voice calls need to be done outside the house.” His contact is [email protected].

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 DEAR NET: Also calling Safaricom is Mwangi Wanjohi, who has a grouse about the pricing. Safaricom Home Fibre internet has remained rather high even after the government made concessions that should have lowered the charges, he says. “Some time in 2018, the government increased excise duty on telephony services and Safaricom took advantage of that to raise its charges for home fibre disproportionately and without warning. Now, the government has reduced VAT from 16 per cent to 14 per cent but Safaricom has not lowered my fee. They sent me an alert to pay the same amount without even giving me a tax invoice as required by the VAT Act.” His contact is [email protected].

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EVOLUTION: There is nothing peculiar about what is happening to the Tuskys supermarket chain as this is the normal life cycle of a business, remarks Stephen Masambu. “There are four stages in this cycle: Introduction, growth, maturity and decline. Any business must be cognisant of these stages, the decline being most crucial.” The solution, according to him, is for a business that has reached the final stage to rebrand, merge or allow itself to be taken over or just die a natural death. “Big boys such as East Africa Industries, Uchumi and Nakumat have come and gone.” His contact is [email protected]


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PRIVATE SCHOOL BAILOUT: Major (Rtd) Martin Wandahwa hopes the government will not side with the Kenya National Union of Teachers (Knut), which is opposed to bailing out private schools. The Kenya Private Schools Association suggested the bailout for fear that the institutions might fail to reopen due to the Covid-19 pandemic. “In the event most private schools do not reopen, the government will take the blame. Sheer logic demands that the government partner with them.” Martin says this would avoid the cost of massive reconstruction and ensure continuity. The government, he appeals, “must swallow its pride, which comes before a fall”. His contact is [email protected]

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MILK OF HUMAN KINDNESS: Having keenly followed the Covid-19 diary of Diana Ndinda in the Daily Nation, Maggie Wanjiru has been moved by an act of generosity. “I’ve been reading the articles by the Kenyan stuck in Nigeria since March 21. Her Nigerian contact, Lanre, has been mentioned over and over as ever present to help in times of need. Once the nightmare is over, I hope we will get to see a picture of Lanre. The support he has given to our countrywoman is what every human being ought to do when an opportunity to show kindness presents itself.” Her contact is [email protected]

Have a caring day, won’t you!

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