ACTSCENE: Mwixx Mutinda enjoys telling stories through acting

Saturday June 9 2018

Mwixx Mutinda's voice echoes on radio every evening as she presents her reggae show. She also acts in a new local production Baba Yao on KTN that airs on Thursdays. PHOTO | COURTESY

Mwixx Mutinda's voice echoes on radio every evening as she presents her reggae show. She also acts in a new local production Baba Yao on KTN that airs on Thursdays. PHOTO | COURTESY 

By NATION REPORTER
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Her voice echoes on radio every evening as she presents her reggae show, she can currently be seen every Thursday on a new local production Baba Yao on KTN. Mwixx Mutinda is a person who does it all and believes her petite body has advantages.


You are an actor, radio presenter and a philanthropist, where do you get the time to do all that?

It’s all about planning, knowing what to prioritize at any given time. Though I must say that in the Care2share Foundation I work with very dedicated members and volunteers who make sure that everything runs smoothly and I’m not overwhelmed.


Given a choice, which one would you choose between radio and acting, why?

Oh no. Can I choose both? I enjoy being able to live different lives and tell stories through the roles that I act. On radio, no one can see you yet there’s this huge connection between you and the listener. I love the power and mystery in it.


You play a 14-year-old girl in the new show Baba Yao, tell us more about your character.

I play Zawadi, this teenager who has been brought up by a single and very young mother, who sends her to live with her dad at fourteen. She’s sweet, hardworking, neat, very sharp and sometimes manipulating (I don’t know why people call her stubborn).


Do you think that being petite lands you more roles as a school girl?

I’d say it gives me the privilege to audition for such roles, then the skill of getting into a teenager’s mind lands me the roles. Acting is a craft, a skill.


You have been in several productions, both on screen and theatre, which has been your most challenging role?

That has to be Josie in All Girls Together, a stage play written by Cajetan Boy, directed by Eugene Oyoo. I almost told Tim to recast on the evening of the premiere, “sema” butterflies!! Hehe. But it turned into one of my best experiences in theatre.


Apart from TV have you done any local movies, if you have which ones?

Yes. See Them Blind, I played a role of a gothic teenager, Msista. It is a short film that made it for the screening at the Palawan International Film Festival and the Cefalù Film Festival in Italy in 2018 among others.


What other projects are you working on?

Of course there’s the ReggaeZone show every Saturday night on Milele FM, I have a music driven entertainment show coming soon on your screen. A couple of short films are also cooking and I have a talk show coming up. I’m spilling too much beans here.


What is your take on the wrangles that we are witnessing between KFCB and KFC?

I wish they could use that energy to support and fight for film makers instead.


Tell us more about your charity, when did you start it and why?

Care2Share Foundation started in 2014. The first home we visited was Made In The Streets, which rehabilitates street kids. The home was very welcoming and allowed us to bond with the kids. We noticed the gap of mentorship and decided to fill it. Later, Watoto Wema home invited us and others.