alexa Why don't local bands stick? - Daily Nation

Why don't local bands stick?

Sunday January 27 2019

They’re known as firework careers; groups or bands whose popularity rockets, flares — and dies all too quickly.

They’re known as firework careers; groups or bands whose popularity rockets, flares — and dies all too quickly. PHOTO| FILE 

GEORGE D. MWENDWA
By GEORGE D. MWENDWA
More by this Author

The climate around new bands/groups has never been as overheated as it is right now. Mild hysteria surrounds any group with at least one good song who can get through the slippery industry without falling over.

Genuine enthusiasm snowballs into frothing hype in the blink of an eye. Backlashes arrive before there's been enough time for a proper lash.

Nobody has time to wait around: not the press, not the record labels, not the record-buyers and, whether they like it or not, certainly not the group who disagree on major terms. Here are some of the groups/bands that went down while at the top of their careers.

KELELE TAKATIFU
When the duo consisting of Moji Short Babaa and Didi kick-started their career with the song “Ni Msoh” featuring Holy Dave seven years ago, it was all merry and dance as the industry welcomed a new style with new energy. They proceeded to prove that they could measure up to the acclaim they had received by releasing hit after hit, which consisted of songs like “Achana na Mimi”, “Ngori”, “Bam-ba Mbaya” among others.

Fissures, however, began displaying when they were still riding high with such hits. Moji released a solo project and Didi followed suit. They both took to the media to announce their split up pointing out that they had come to an agreement that it was time to spread wings and follow personal interests.

AMOS AND JOSH
They rose to fame as one of the greatest voices the reality TV show Tusker Project Fame ever had during its time. They then became one of Kenya’s sensations, producing hits and even collaborating with Sauti Sol in one of the greatest songs of all time dubbed “Nerea”.

Advertisement

Just when music lovers were almost getting cosy for a sweeter ride, Amos and Josh pulled down the video of their new single “Heri Tuachane” just 10 hours after its upload.

The duo had been engaged in shuttle diplomacy between their management and the parents of Amos’ ex-lover which sent the entire social media into frenzy with rumour mills and facts trending in equal measure.
Their manager Ally Ady was at the verge of closing what he termed an almost sweet deal when he realised that all was not well in their camp. Their producer, the late Bruce Odhiambo, while recalling the events described a tense situation that almost led to Amos forsaking music. Josh has now rebranded to Manio and recently dropped his latest single dubbed “Ordinary Folk”.

TPK SONS

Winning two awards and receiving eight nominations in Top Gospel Awards was part of the achievements this Ragga gospel group, which kick-started its career as a trio in 2012, realised.

They also got their album out in 2017 dubbed God Above Everything, getting them not only local but also international recognition. When all seemed to be running swiftly, one of the members, Paul Mangapi, left the country for greener pastures, crippling the operations of the group and forcing everyone into solo projects. Their music, however, continues to receive massive airplay, though they cannot all be present at once for performances.

MOG
One of the greatest groups that came, shone and left way too fast was Men of God who took the industry by surprise releasing hits constantly, performing in top events in Africa and internationally and endorsing top brands.

When Boss MoG, one among the trio spoke to Buzz, he disclosed that they had differences that could not be resolved at the time, and each needed to concentrate on solo projects. He, however, disclosed recently that they are ready to hit the industry yet again but only as two of them this time, since Tony had relocated to the US. Only time will tell whether they will last this time round where any group hardly survives to reap enough.

SOC
“Zongelela” and “Bila Yesu” are some of the hits the SOC trio was riding high with at the time of their split up to concentrate on personal projects. Only two went solo with the third one quitting the music scene for reasons he didn’t disclose.

When Njoseh, one among the trio, spoke to Buzz, he narrated that they had individual ambitions and at times differed over small issues, which they couldn’t disclose.

He also cited differences in verve and the desire to achieve the group’s goals, causing loyalty issues and crippling the group in the end. He was firm on the adage that holds that, “two cannot walk together unless they agree”. He added that they go for long without talking, even years, but that even then they have no bad blood.

RECAPP
The hip hop music group, that consisted of four members, was one of the favourites in the gospel scene, getting to headline top events and bagging several awards. When their hit single “5 Stones” was still receiving massive airplay, cracks started showing when they started citing reasons like inadequate time to meet, a tight school schedule for all of them and the need to grow their own personal brands.

They, however, encouraged their dispirited fans that all was well and there was no bad blood between them, despite mincing their words on a lot that was happening behind the scenes.

Advertisement