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MUM STORIES: Why my mother means the world to me

Monday May 13 2019

From left: Elvis, his father his father Solomon Tawuo Samperu and  mum Agnes Nairesiae Pesi Pesiand  at Elvis' graduation party. PHOTO| COURTESY

From left: Elvis, his father his father Solomon Tawuo Samperu and mum Agnes Nairesiae Pesi Pesiand at Elvis' graduation party. PHOTO| COURTESY 

KAREN MBUYA MURIUKI
By KAREN MBUYA MURIUKI
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Elvis Samperu tells Karen Muriuki why he appreciates his mother this Mother’s Day.

 

I had not been home in three months before visiting in April. I’ve been caught up with work. This is why I made the conscious decision to go that one weekend, especially since my 20-year-old brother and 14-year-old sister were also home. It was a full house.

Like any other mother, mine was elated for all of us to be there. She made her special meal for us- you know, the ones mothers make that you can never find in any restaurant or house.

But what really stood out for me that weekend was her inviting our reverend over for dinner, and more so, to pray for us- her family. Most parents would have opted to take the family out to dinner, but not mum. She knew it would be a couple of months before she sees us again, so she decided to do this for us.

RELIGIOUS PERSON

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She has always been a religious person. Church was mandatory for us every Sunday. And I am grateful because that is what has kept me grounded all these years of adulthood. It’s not about to change either.

Mum is also tough. Extra tough, if I can say that. This is the reason I have never had any tattoos or piercings. I am just not bold enough to go against her rules, inasmuch as I don’t live with her anymore. My peers always assume that I have a tattoo, a piercing or both. But whenever they question me about it, I am accustomed to lie that I am just not into them. If only they knew.

Her toughness has made me who I am today.

Growing up, my parents rarely spoke to us in Swahili or English. They ensured they communicated in Kimaasai so that we could learn the language. I am fluent in the language now, and it is such an important thing for me. For that, I appreciate you mum.

I appreciate you for a lot of other things too.

For all the sacrifices you made, and continuously make, thank you, yeiyo.

There is not a single day we ever lacked. Not one. You love us so wholeheartedly and that means the world to us.

I appreciate you for the hard work you put in to progress yourself. The fact that you decided to pursue your degree in the last four years, having to commute daily from Kajiado to the Central Business District to attend classes is amazing. It is inspiring seeing how you commit yourself with everything. It pushes me to do more.

And mum, my promise to you is to retire you early so that I can provide everything for you. Never forget that.

Mum, what can I say but that I’m grateful that you are my mother. Your prayers have been a constant fixture in my life, since I was a young boy. They continue to envelop me to date. Your warmth accompanies me on a daily basis. I know I get by most days because of your unending prayers and warm thoughts of me. Mum, you’re a gem, a jewel, one of a kind. And I love you.

It’s your nature to be aware of everyone around you. My giving nature is all from you. You have been a rock for me and my siblings, my cousins and entire extended family.

You help all without fear or favour. Your insistence on discipline, adherence to our language. I now appreciate all you did for me and especially instilling discipline in me.

I know maybe sometimes I don’t show you how much I love and value you but always know that you will always be the most important woman in my life. 

 

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