ASK HR: If the promise made is not on contract, it is not binding  - Daily Nation

If the promise made is not on contract, it is not binding 

Thursday May 10 2018

Salary is a very emotive issue, the major reason most employees leave organisations. It also determines if a candidate accepts a job offer or not. PHOTO | FOTOSEARCH

Salary is a very emotive issue, the major reason most employees leave organisations. It also determines if a candidate accepts a job offer or not. PHOTO | FOTOSEARCH 

By JANE MUIRURI
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Q As I write this, I am livid because I have just received last month’s payslip, proof that our HR manager doesn’t keep her word.

When I interviewed for this position, I was promised that the company would review my salary after two months. They didn’t. I sought audience with her and she promised that it would be done in the third month.

I am on my sixth month now and the pay rise hasn’t been effected. What should I do?

 

Salary is a very emotive issue, the major reason most employees leave organisations. It also determines if a candidate accepts a job offer or not.

That said, HR managers are often hard-pressed to identify and compete for good talent and might therefore overpromise in an effort to get a candidate to sign up for the role.

Your complaint is not unique, and though I do not want to burst your bubble, any employment commitment that is not documented is null and void. This is also applicable to any promise of additional benefits that are not stipulated in the employment contract.

The contract you sign on acceptance of the offer has all the conditions of employment stated in there including remuneration, which is binding and must be enforced.

In future, if for a fact the employer intends to review your salary after confirmation, insist on this being included as part of your contract.

HR Managers guide departmental managers in matters related to remuneration, however, the ultimate person who ought to recommend salary review is the supervisor, hence your anger is misdirected.

Engage your supervisor on the matter, and if he is convinced you deserve a salary review, he will pick up the conversation with the HR manager.

This approach transfers the burden to your supervisor and frees you to concentrate on your work. If this approach is not successful, I suggest that you focus on your job, hoping your supervisor will see your efforts and recommend a salary review in future.

However, if you are very disgruntled, start scouting for another role and negotiate for a salary that meets your expectations and financial obligations. Word of caution though, salary is not the only motivator to remain loyal to an employer.

There are many employers that pay high salaries but the culture and environment is very toxic for the wellbeing of employees.

Evaluate, therefore, what else you like about your current employer.

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