Why leaders with 'fake' degrees are in trouble - Daily Nation

EACC pursues leaders with 'fake' academic papers

Tuesday April 3 2018

Granton Samboja

Taita-Taveta Governor Granton Samboja (left) and former Kasipul Kabondo MP Oyugi Magwanga. Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission is investigating them following reports that they forged certificates. PHOTO | FILE | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

By DAVID MWERE
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Leaders are on the spot over forged academic papers that they use to contest political positions.

According to the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission, the forgery reports hit the roof following a decree that anyone aspiring to be president or governor must have a university degree.

The requirement that those seeking parliamentary positions have at least a post-Form Four qualification has, however, been put on hold. 

EACC is investigating Taita-Taveta Governor Granton Samboja and former Kasipul Kabondo MP Oyugi Magwanga following reports that they forged their certificates.

The commission has recommended the prosecution of Meru Senator Mithika Linturi after the University of Nairobi discontinued his law degree programme, citing fake papers.

Mr Samboja, Mr Magwanga and Mr Linturi reportedly presented forged documents to the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission for clearance before the August 8, 2017 General Election.

While Mr Samboja dethroned Mr John Mruttu as governor, Mr Magwanga lost to Mr Cyprian Awiti in the Orange Democratic Movement primaries.

FORGING DOCUMENTS

EACC spokesman Yasin Amaro told the Nation that investigations against the former MP and Mr Samboja are almost complete.

“The commission will soon submit their files to the Director of Public Prosecutions,” Mr Amaro said.

It means Mr Magwanga and Mr Samboja could be charged with forging documents and providing false information.

They could also be first high profile cases for new DPP Noordin Haji, following his swearing-in at State House Nairobi last week.  

Kenyatta University has disowned Mr Samboja’s papers, saying he has never been a student at the institution.

The governor has since filed a case to stop EACC from investigating him.

NO ADMISSION LETTER

An analysis of data at the University of Nairobi’s student management information system shows that Mr Magwanga lacks an admission letter though the former MP says he enrolled for a diploma course in 2013.

The former MP also says he paid fees in May 2013 and was issued with a registration number.

According to the SMIS, Mr Magwanga paid fees for all the 2012/13 academic year semesters on November 25, 2013.

It also shows that he paid fees for the second semester of the 2013/14 academic year on November 19, 2013.

DIPLOMA COURSE

EACC wants to know how and why the former lawmaker could pay fees for the second academic year only to pay for the first year six days later.

A detective attached to the commission said Mr Magwanga’s fee payments do not show receipt numbers but his registration number.

On October 7, 2013, Mr Magwanga was registered for a bachelor’s degree (module II) using a different identity card number from the one he used for the diploma course.

“It shows the programme was to succeed the diploma but the diploma was not concluded so the actual ID could not be used,” the EACC officer said.

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