alexa Monitor reopens after 10-day siege by police - Daily Nation

Monitor reopens after 10-day siege by police

Thursday May 30 2013

Daily Monitor employees celebrate after the re-opening of the Daily Monitor, KFM and Dembe FM offices. PHOTO/ABUBAKER LUBOWA

Daily Monitor employees celebrate after the re-opening of the Daily Monitor, KFM and Dembe FM offices. PHOTO/ABUBAKER LUBOWA  

By LILLIAN ONYANGO [email protected] and AFP

The Daily Monitor Thursday reopened after the Ugandan Government ordered police to leave its offices after a 10-day siege that has sparked widespread criticism.

However, another newspaper remains shut.

Police closed down the Daily Monitor and Red Pepper, which remains shut, on May 20 after they reported arguments among army generals on whether President Yoweri Museveni’s son is to succeed him.

Nation Media Group’s KFM and Dembe FM were also switched off by police after producing warrants to search for a letter written by Gen David Sejusa, the coordinator of Security Services.

Gen Sejusa, in his letter, asked the director-general of the Internal Security Organisation to investigate allegations that there was a plot to assassinate top army and government officials opposed to an alleged plan to enable Brig Muhoozi Keinerugaba to succeed his father as the next president.

Armed security operatives were deployed at the headquarters of the media houses, blocking staff from entering the premises. Media houses were stopped from publishing while police searched for the leaked confidential documents that were quoted.

“This is what we have been waiting for,” the Monitor’s managing director, Mr Alex Asiimwe, said. “After all this time, we are back to operations.”

While announcing the reopening of the Monitor offices, Internal Affairs Minister Hilary Onek said the police called off the Monitor premises siege so that they resume their normal business as they carry on with the search.

“However, to allow the paper to reopen, Monitor officials have agreed to tighten their internal editorial processes, including ensuring stories that impact especially on national security are subjected to the most rigorous scrutiny and verification process before they run,” Mr Onek added.