US official urges patience on Kenya graft cases

Saturday May 25 2019

corruption

Kenya has a big challenge with corruption and wastage of the scarce public resources. FILE PHOTO | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

KEVIN J. KELLEY
By KEVIN J. KELLEY
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NEW YORK,

A top US law enforcement urged frustrated Kenyans on Thursday to “be a little bit patient” concerning the outcome of corruption cases.

“Anti-corruption investigations are particularly complex,” Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Heather Merritt said in a press briefing.

“They tend to involve multiple jurisdictions because often corrupt officials are able to move assets amongst various jurisdictions both within your country and internationally,” Ms Merritt added.

She was speaking in response to a reporter's question about the paucity of corruption convictions in Kenya.

CURB IMPUNITY

Ms Merritt, who heads the State Department's bureau of international narcotics and law enforcement, also cited US efforts to strengthen Kenya's police service and to develop programmes intended to curb impunity.

She noted that she had co-chaired discussions on security and democracy as part of the recent US-Kenya Bilateral Strategic Dialogue held in Washington.

The US pledged in that forum to provide “technical and operational assistance” to the internal affairs unit of the Kenya police service as well as to the Independent Policing Oversight Authority.

Ms Merritt emphasised that corruption can most effectively be addressed through strong national institutions that enforce accountability.

“It is all about stopping impunity,” she said. “It's about society's demanding accountability, but most of all it's about developing strong independent institutions that are able to combat corruption across the criminal justice sector.”

ADEQUATE SALARIES

The US official rejected arguments that corruption can be eliminated by increasing low salaries paid to law-enforcement personnel in poor countries.

“Adequate salaries are not enough,” Ms Merritt declared. “Even in countries where officials are very well paid, there are sometimes people who fall prey unfortunately to corruption and so we have got to do everything we can to strengthen institutions.”

She pointed to the example of the corruption scandal that shook the world football authority known as Fifa a few years ago.

“It's not because (former Fifa head) Sepp Blatter was underpaid,” Ms Merritt said. “It's not because the Fifa commissioners around the world were underpaid that they were susceptible to bribes... They made a decision to engage in corruption.”

The Fifa scandals were exposed because “there were institutions that were able to do investigations to hold accountable those who were involved,” Ms Merritt noted.

She also sounded an alarm about “burgeoning illicit markets” in Africa.

“Wildlife poaching and trafficking represents an escalating international security and conservation crisis,” Ms Merritt warned. “What we are seeing now in many of your countries is coordinated slaughter which was commissioned by armed and organized criminal syndicates.”