I can’t promise to bring back Chibok girls, says Muhammadu Buhari

Tuesday April 14 2015

Children under the auspices of Chibok Girls Ambassadors march to press for the release of 219 schoolgirls abducted by Boko Haram Islamists militants during a demonstration at ministry of education in Abuja, on April 14, 2015. AFP PHOTO

Children under the auspices of Chibok Girls Ambassadors march to press for the release of 219 schoolgirls abducted by Boko Haram Islamists militants during a demonstration at ministry of education in Abuja, on April 14, 2015. AFP PHOTO 

AFP
By AFP
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ABUJA

Nigeria’s president-elect Muhammadu Buhari on Tuesday cautioned he could not make promises on the return of 219 schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram, as the country marked the first anniversary of their abduction.

The comments by Buhari, who takes office on May 29, stand in contrast to outgoing President Goodluck Jonathan, who has repeatedly said the girls will be found, and the military, which said last year it knew where the teenagers were being held.

A march was held in Abuja symbolically involving 219 schoolgirls, part of a number of events around the world to mark the abduction, which Amnesty International said was one of 38 since the start of last year that had seen at least 2,000 women taken by the militants.

The UN and African rights groups also called for an end to the targeting of boys and girls in the conflict, which has left at least 15,000 dead and some 1.5 million people homeless, 800,000 of them children.

Mr Buhari said there was a need for “honesty” in his new government’s approach to the girls’ abduction, with nothing seen or heard from the students since last May when they appeared in a Boko Haram video.

“We do not know if the Chibok girls can be rescued. Their whereabouts remain unknown. As much as I wish to, I cannot promise that we can find them,” he said in a statement. “But I say to every parent, family member and friend of the children that my government will do everything in its power to bring them home.”

Schoolgirls, wearing red T-shirts and holding placards with the kidnapped girls names on them, marched to the education ministry to demand the hostages’ immediate release.

“We, the Chibok Girls Ambassadors, are demanding that the government of Nigeria should give us clear details of what is being done to bring back our sisters,” said one, Rebecca Ishaku.

“We ask that the government, as a matter of priority, makes education safe in all parts of Nigeria while prioritising the return of our sisters.”

The UN special envoy on education, Britain’s former prime minister Gordon Brown, described the campaign as “the most iconic fight of a freedom struggle”.