The cutting edge

Thursday February 8 2018

‘Safari city’: One way to fully reinvigorate Nairobi, David Kilonzi proposes, is to change its nickname from the ‘Green City in the Sun’ to the ‘Safari City’. With the development of more residential and office buildings, and the growth of informal settlements, David adds, Nairobi no longer fits the epithet of the ‘Green City’. The ‘Safari’ tag, he explains, would be more applicable, as Nairobi is still the only city in the world that has a national park. He is raring to patent the new slogan before someone else pinches it. His contact is [email protected]

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Worrying neglect: While she appreciates the fact that the government is busy building highways around the country, Diana D’souza is a bit disappointed about the total neglect of the roads in Nairobi’s residential areas. Some have been further ruined as they are used as shortcuts to the new big roads, citing Jacaranda Avenue, Mageta Road and Brookside Drive west of the city centre, as new buildings eat up pavements and parking spaces. “What has become of Nema?” Her contact is [email protected]

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TV blackout: During the week-long shutdown of the three leading TV stations, KTN, NTV and Citizen, Mombasa resident Toto Arege says he and others in the coastal resort town lost a lot due to the information blackout. And largely to blame, according to him, are “a few people, who could have violated the law”. Kenyans, he adds, must never be denied their constitutional right to access useful information, and the leaders must always prioritise dialogue to break such stalemates that only hurt the entire country’s interests. His contact is [email protected]

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Social disorder: Fully agreeing with the observation that there has been a total breakdown in social order in the country lately, Mwangi Wanjohi declares: “We have no culture, no national values and are not at peace with ourselves. Anything and everything is acceptable; from the police failing to assist students making distress calls, and watching on the streets as people are mugged or vehicles vandalised, driving on the wrong side of the road and overlapping, bigotry and tribalism, or hawkers displaying their wares in the middle of the road, name it.” His contact is [email protected]

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Foreign author: The recent complaint by a reader about a new book on Equity Bank’s seminal success having been written by a foreigner is misplaced, says Georg Gathu. He adds: “Once a scholar you have all the four corners of the world to go and conquer. You can go and teach anywhere in the world, as the late Prof Calestous Juma did at Harvard University or do some research. Indeed, this international scrutiny should instead create some pride in a local banking solution possibly adaptable elsewhere.” His contact is [email protected]
 
Have a universal day, won’t you!