THE CUTTING EDGE

The proposal to lower the minimum entry grades for teacher training colleges calls for thorough consultations.

IN SUMMARY

  • Raising the quality and standards of secondary education is what we really need to address” and “shortage of students will never be an issue.”

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TEACHER TRAINING: The proposal to lower the minimum entry grades for teacher training colleges calls for thorough consultations, pleads F. Mukembu. The quality of education, he adds, “should never be compromised at whatever cost”. He’s convinced that “raising the quality and standards of secondary education is what we really need to address” and “shortage of students will never be an issue”. And since our institutions of learning produce students for local and international markets, there can be no compromise on the quality. His contact is fmukembu@gmail.com.

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GRAFT WAR: While we often hear about high-profile personalities arrested for crimes, Washington, DC-based Kenyan Andayi Mushenye says, not many ever get convicted and jailed. “We heard that people stole public money and carried it away in bags but have not heard of any found and returned. We hear our government signing agreements with other countries to return stolen loot but never hear how much they have actually found and returned. MPs go on expensive fact-finding missions abroad but we never hear of any facts they found.” His contact mushenye@gmail.com.

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ILLEGAL STRUCTURES: Many people like to criticise Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko, Diana Dsouza says, but to blame for construction on wrong sites is Nema. It’s they, she adds, who permit the haphazard work with no consideration for existing buildings. The offending buildings include structures that block out light and air and do not cater for tenants’ parking, resulting in many using pavements! As a result, Kenya Power has difficulty serving customers and Nairobi Water cannot supply properly as the infrastructure is lacking. Her contact is diana@encompas.co.ke.

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KIOSKS: Nyeri Town resident Joginder Sokhi says he has been appealing to the authorities to stop the mushrooming kiosks but nobody cares. He wishes the ongoing crackdown could be replicated in Nyeri. “I am not scared to say that only corruption makes people not to adhere to laws and regulations. If corruption and the theft of public money could be stopped, we would not have debated fuel cost increase and this country would be having super highways throughout. Leaders must think about our country and not yourselves.” His contact is jogindersokhi@gmail.com.

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BRITTLE CONCRETE: There was a lot of excitement when Kenya Power introduced the use of concrete poles but the change has not yielded the expected results, Ken Ogare reports. Whereas they were expected to be tougher than wood, they have turned out to be “very brittle”. Whenever, they are “hit even slightly by a car they crumble, unlike the timber poles, leaving messy sight on the road”. He cites the stretch from Hilton Garden Inn on Mombasa Road all the way to Mlolongo, inviting Kenya Power management to just take a look. His contact is k_ogare@yahoo.com.

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FUEL COST: Preeyesh Shah’s argument that the increase in fuel prices following the 16 per cent VAT should be shared among passengers and, if they are 16, each forks out Sh1, is wrong, says arithmetic guru Jeff Kiaraha. “What he overlooked is that this 16 per cent is charged per litre of fuel. A matatu cruising from Thika to Nairobi, about 30 kilometres, will probably consume 10 litres of fuel, whose VAT will be Sh160. It, therefore, makes sense to increase the fare by between Sh10 and Sh20.” His contact is jeffkiaraho@gmail.com.

Have a calculative day, won’t you!

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