THE CUTTING EDGE

Sunday February 4 2018

BLACKOUT BLUNDER: The gagging of three leading TV stations, NTV, KTN and Citizen, Njoroge Kibe says, reminds him of the 1980s, when now retired President Daniel arap Moi banned the playing of Congolese music on the State-owned Kenya Broadcasting Corporation after local musicians complained the station was biased against them. “You, Kenyans, must be patriotic. How do you listen to music in a language you do not understand?” he asked. Kenyans, Njoroge adds, ignored him and those who couldn’t afford record players turned to jukeboxes.
“With Al Jazeera and TRT World, the Jubilee ban, like Kanu’s, will also fail.” His contact is [email protected] 

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BLOATED CABINET: President Uhuru Kenyatta’s bloated Cabinet is just about “rewarding cronies and failures for political expediency at the expense of the economy and competency”, says Mario Weru. The irony, though, he adds, is that the President is on record as having voiced concern about the runaway public wage bill. Mario also can’t help faulting the President for then going ahead to “dig a hole by creating the amorphous position of chief administrative secretary”. He quips: “The economy is on its knees yet when it comes to politics, we tend to look the other side!” His contact is [email protected]

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STRANGE STREET NAMES: The recent renaming of some roads in Nairobi, giving them some religious affiliation, is something Mahendra Shah is rather curious about. Aware that streets and roads are often named in honour of national heroes or people who have done some exemplary work, Mahendra would like to know why Masari Road is now known as Pramukh Swami Street. There is also Swamipaba Road, off 1st Avenue Parklands, Saminarayan Street in Lang’ata, and perhaps the longest street name in Kenya, also in Lang’ata, Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin Road. Could the city authorities shed some light on this?
His contact is [email protected]

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PERENNIAL SNARL-UP: A regular commuter on Mombasa Road, Nairobi, Ken Mukanga, says that squarely to blame for the perennial snarl-ups are the police controlling traffic, especially at Cabanas Restaurant. “They block traffic on the highway for even up to 10 minutes, and yet there is traffic from Syokimau, Mlolongo, Athi River, Utawala and Kitengela. The vehicles from Embakasi flow freely, as the newly rebuilt Outering Road is now open. Why close the major road for so long and yet this is not a roundabout? Priority should be given to vehicles on Mombasa Road. We are at the mercy of traffic police.”
His contact is [email protected]

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GOATS' PLAYING GROUND: Mombasa resident Aitor Mwakio has found himself grappling with the perennial question: What’s in a name? Apparently one with some interest in sports and most likely what has been described as the beautiful game, football, which is quite popular at the coastal resort town, Aitor was amused when he came across the name, Uwanja wa Mbuzi (goats’ playing ground) in Kongowea. This, he reports, is where Nation Football Club recently played two friendly matches. He poses: “Could this name be a reference to the players who have been using it or the ground itself?”
His contact is [email protected]

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RIGGED ROAD: The newly rebuilt Outer Ring Road in Nairobi’s Eastlands is a great development, but it does not favour the residents of Tassia and Fedha, who are some of the people it was meant for, says Benson Ndao. Pedestrians, he moans, have to cross three barriers to get public transport, while motorists have to go all the way to Taj Mall to be able to turn and head to Donholm. And it now takes 45 minutes to reach the Fedha Estate junction, a kilometre away, because of heavy traffic jams.
“Something is wrong with the design,” claims Benson, whose contact is [email protected]

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DRUGS AND MEDICINE: Many people, including some health professionals, Dr R.T Kamau claims, “often confuse the words ‘drug’ and ‘medicine’, usually using them interchangeably”. The two words, he explains, don’t mean the same. “While all medicinal substances are drugs, not all drugs are medicinal substances. A chemical substance administered to a patient and whose outcome is protective or curative is a medicine. A chemical substance administered to a person and whose outcome is not protective or curative is a drug. Paracetamol is a medicine, but marijuana is a drug.”
His contact is [email protected]
  
Have a medicinal day, won’t you!